Homeowner Permits

Homeowner permits are available for small grading projects completed by the property owner. Please read our FAQ section prior to completing the application below.

Homeowner permits are available for small grading projects completed by the property owner. Please read our FAQ section prior to completing the application below.

Frequently Asked Questions: Shoreline Grading Permits

Do I need a permit from the watershed district for my shoreline project?

Our permitting process largely depends on the location of your project and its relation to the 100-year flood level.

Why is the 100-year flood mark important?

The 100-year flood mark is the projected water level of your lake or wetland during a 100-year storm. Shoreland below this elevation is considered in the floodplain. Fill added to the floodplain can eventually contribute to a loss of flood storage and higher water levels, particularly during large rainfall events

How can I determine where the 100-year flood level lies on my property?

If you have hired a contractor for grading work they can utilize the site survey or grading plan for the project to determine where the 100-year marker is located.  These 100-year elevations vary by water body. You can contact RWMWD at office@rwmwd.org and we will assist you.

My project will reach below the 100- year flood mark. What’s next?

You will need a permit from the watershed district to proceed with your grading work.  Complete and submit the form at the bottom of this page and an RWMWD staff member will contact you within 15 business days.

My project is above the 100-year flood mark. Do I need a permit?

Watershed staff is working with our 12 member cities to eliminate permitting redundancy for residents. If your project does not involve work in the floodplain and is less than 1,000 square feet of soil disturbance, you do not need a watershed permit. If your project does not involve work in the floodplain but is more than 1,000 square feet, the watershed may defer permitting to the city.

Is the permit requirement new? Is it just required for my area?

The grading permit rules have been in place since 2006 and apply to all properties in the Ramsey Washington Metro Watershed District. Other watershed districts and watershed management organizations also regulate floodplain alterations.

Why are permits required for these projects? What is the role of RWMWD in this process?

Among other things, the watershed regulates flood control and permitting to ensure these floodplain projects are completed in a way that does not increase the risk of flooding for property adjacent to water bodies.


Resident Permit Applications

Download the PDF version of the application or fill out an application online.

Downloadable Permit Application

This is the PDF version of the resident permit application.

Online Resident Permit Application

Go here to fill out an online application for a resident permit (it’s faster).